C# if-else

Certainly! In C#, the if-else statement is used to conditionally execute different blocks of code based on a Boolean expression. The general syntax of the if-else statement is as follows:

if (condition)
{
    // Code to execute if the condition is true
}
else
{
    // Code to execute if the condition is false
}

Here’s an example to illustrate how the if-else statement works:

int number = 10;

if (number > 0)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is positive.");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is zero or negative.");
}

In this example, the condition number > 0 is evaluated. If the condition is true (i.e., number is greater than 0), the code block inside the if statement will execute, and it will print “The number is positive.” Otherwise, if the condition is false, the code block inside the else statement will execute, and it will print “The number is zero or negative.”

You can also chain multiple else if conditions to handle different cases. Here’s an example:

int score = 85;

if (score >= 90)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Excellent!");
}
else if (score >= 80)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Good job!");
}
else if (score >= 70)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Not bad.");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("You need to improve.");
}

In this example, the code checks the value of the score variable and executes the corresponding code block based on the score range. If the score is greater than or equal to 90, it prints “Excellent!”; if the score is between 80 and 89, it prints “Good job!”; if the score is between 70 and 79, it prints “Not bad.”; otherwise, if none of the conditions match, it prints “You need to improve.”

That’s a basic overview of using the if-else statement in C#. Let me know if you have any more specific questions!

C# IF Statement:

Certainly! In C#, the if statement is used to conditionally execute a block of code based on a Boolean expression. The general syntax of the if statement is as follows:

if (condition)
{
    // Code to execute if the condition is true
}

Here’s an example to illustrate how the if statement works:

int number = 10;

if (number > 0)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is positive.");
}

In this example, the condition number > 0 is evaluated. If the condition is true (i.e., number is greater than 0), the code block inside the if statement will execute, and it will print “The number is positive.”

You can also use the if statement without an else clause if you don’t need to specify code to execute when the condition is false.

int x = 5;

if (x == 5)
{
    Console.WriteLine("x is equal to 5.");
}

In this example, if x is equal to 5, the code block inside the if statement will execute and print “x is equal to 5.”

You can also nest multiple if statements within each other or combine them with logical operators like && (AND) or || (OR) to create more complex conditions. Here’s an example:

int age = 25;
bool isStudent = true;

if (age >= 18 && isStudent)
{
    Console.WriteLine("You are eligible for a student discount.");
}

In this example, the code checks if the age is greater than or equal to 18 AND the person is a student (isStudent is true). If both conditions are true, it executes the code block inside the if statement and prints “You are eligible for a student discount.”

That’s a basic overview of using the if statement in C#. Let me know if you have any more specific questions!

C# If-else Example: with input from user

Certainly! Here’s an example of using the if-else statement in C# with input from the user:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Enter your age: ");
        string ageInput = Console.ReadLine();

        if (int.TryParse(ageInput, out int age))
        {
            if (age >= 18)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("You are eligible to vote.");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("You are not eligible to vote yet.");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Invalid input. Please enter a valid age.");
        }
    }
}

In this example, the program prompts the user to enter their age. The input is read from the console using Console.ReadLine() and stored in the ageInput variable as a string.

Next, the int.TryParse() method is used to parse the input string into an integer value. If the parsing is successful, the parsed age is stored in the age variable, and the program proceeds with the if-else statement.

The if-else statement checks if the age is greater than or equal to 18. If it is, it prints “You are eligible to vote.” Otherwise, if the age is less than 18, it prints “You are not eligible to vote yet.”

If the input cannot be parsed into an integer (i.e., the user enters invalid input), the else block of the outer if-else statement is executed, and it prints “Invalid input. Please enter a valid age.”

This example demonstrates how you can use the if-else statement to perform different actions based on user input.

C# IF-else-if ladder Statement:

Certainly! In C#, you can use an if-else-if ladder statement when you have multiple conditions to check. The if-else-if ladder allows you to specify multiple conditions and execute different blocks of code based on the conditions. Here’s the general syntax:

if (condition1)
{
    // Code to execute if condition1 is true
}
else if (condition2)
{
    // Code to execute if condition1 is false and condition2 is true
}
else if (condition3)
{
    // Code to execute if condition1 and condition2 are false and condition3 is true
}
// Add more else if blocks if needed
else
{
    // Code to execute if none of the conditions are true
}

Each condition is evaluated one by one from top to bottom. The code block associated with the first true condition is executed, and the rest of the conditions are skipped.

Here’s an example of an if-else-if ladder statement:

int number = 5;

if (number == 0)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is zero.");
}
else if (number > 0 && number < 10)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is a single-digit positive number.");
}
else if (number >= 10 && number < 100)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is a two-digit positive number.");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("The number is either negative or has more than two digits.");
}

In this example, the value of number is evaluated against multiple conditions. If number is equal to 0, it prints “The number is zero.” If number is greater than 0 and less than 10, it prints “The number is a single-digit positive number.” If number is greater than or equal to 10 and less than 100, it prints “The number is a two-digit positive number.” If none of the conditions are true, it prints “The number is either negative or has more than two digits.”

That’s how you can use the if-else-if ladder statement in C# to handle multiple conditions. Let me know if you have any more questions!