Transformation of sentences

 

The transformation of sentences is classified into three types and they are

  • Simple Sentences
  • Complex Sentences
  • Compound Sentences

 

What is Clause?

A collection of words that consist of a subject and a predicate is known as a Clause. It is a collection of words but never a complete sentence and is further elaborated through its two types.

 

Independent Clause:

An independent clause can be identified through the following aspects;

  • It can stand idle as a sentence
  • It can become a part of a sentence that contains more than one clause
  • It contains conjunctions such as – for, yet, or, nor, but, so, and

 

Dependent Clause

A dependent clause is the one that contains the following aspects.

  • It contains a subject and a predicate.
  • It can’t be used idle as a sentence
  • It is the most important of a sentence on which it depends in order to express the meaning

 

A dependent clause is further classified into the following types

Adjective Clause or Relative Clause:

An adjective or relative clause is similar to an adjective and is used to modify the nouns or pronouns in a sentence with the help of words such as whose, where, who, whom, that, whoever, which, etc.

Example:

  • This the museum that I was telling you about.
  • The person who just walked in owns this restaurant.

 

Adverb Clause or Adverbial Clause:

It is also referred to as a subordinate clause due to being a dependent clause that subordinates with conjunctions such as until, although, if, because, if, as if, when, etc.

Example:

  • Although he was afraid, the boy learned swimming.

 

Noun Clause:

A clause that serves the function of complementing a subject or an object is known as a Noun Clause. It begins with the similar words that start adjective clauses, for instance, where, who, whether, when, which, how, why and that.

Example:

  • Whether you come to collect the documents is up to you.

 

To determine the types of transformation of sentences it is mandatory to be aware of the definition and concept of Simple Sentences, Complex Sentences, and Compound Sentences.

 

Simple Sentence:

A sentence that consist of one independent clause is known as a Simple Sentence.

Example:

  • He slept in the class.

 

Compound Sentence:

A sentence constructed with more than one clause is known as a compound sentence.

Example:

  • I had decided to visit my best friend tonight, but I couldn’t do so as I left from work late.

 

Transforming Simple Sentences into Complex Sentences:

The conversion of simple sentences into complex sentences is a simple conversion or transformation. It can be done by elaborating a word into a phrase or into a clause, furthermore, the process remains the same if the sentence is required to change into a simple sentence from a complex sentence. This can be accomplished by excluding a clause into a phrase or a word.

The following examples are given to develop a better understanding of concepts and conventional rules for conventional transformation between Simple Sentences and Complex Sentences.

Rule: 1

A present participle is a simple sentence and can be easily converted into a complex sentence by adding words such as when, since and as in the first half of the sentence.

Example

Simple Sentence: Finishing my work, I left the office early

Complex Sentence: As I finished my work, I left the office early.

 

Rule: 2

The use of being or verb with ing in a sentence is used to convert it into a complex sentence by including when, since, as in the first half of the sentence

Example:

Simple Sentence: After graduating, he was really happy.

Complex Sentence: As she had graduated, she was really happy.

 

Rule: 3

The usage of Too…to in a simple sentence to change it into a complex sentence also by adding that…..so (negative).

Simple Sentence: The team is too good to lose this game.

Complex Sentence: the team is so good that they cannot lose this game.

 

Rule: 4

Use To in a simple sentence and in order to convert it into a complex sentence add so that in the sentence.

Simple Sentence: People work to earn money.

Complex Sentence: People work so that they can earn money.

 

Rule: 5

Add in spite of or despite of in a simple sentence in order to make it a simple sentence. To transform it into a complex sentence add though or although in the sentence.

Simple Sentence: Despite the full crowd, the concert didn’t start on time,

Complex Sentence: Although the crowd was full, the concert didn’t start on time.

 

Rule: 6

Add because of in a simple sentence and in order to convert it in a complex sentence add the word since at the beginning of a sentence.

Simple Sentence: Because of being late, he had his pay cut off.

Complex Sentence: Since he was late, he had his pay cut off.

 

Rule: 7

For simple sentence, the structure is subject + verb + object + present participle and for complex sentence, the structure is subject + verb + object + relative pronoun of object + to be verb according to relative pronoun and tense + rest of the sentence.

Simple Sentence: I like the black color dress.

Complex Sentence: I like the dress which has black color.

 

Rule: 8

If you are writing a simple sentence it will start with without and if you add if/in case it will be converted into a complex sentence.

Simple Sentence: Without the internet, he cannot complete his assignment.

Complex Sentence: If there is no internet, he cannot complete his assignment.

 

Rule: 9

Use at the time in a simple sentence and in order to make it a complex sentence use when instead of at the time.

Simple Sentence: He wasn’t home at the time for dinner.

Complex Sentence: He wasn’t home when it was dinner time.

 

Rule: 10

In a simple sentence, we will use adjective and it will be converted into that/which in complex sentences.

Simple Sentence: It was a very fast car.

Complex Sentence: It was a car which was very fast.

 

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